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The California Journalism Preservation Act would do more harm than good. Here’s how the state might better help news
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April 25, 2013, 2:49 p.m.
LINK: www.capitalnewyork.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   April 25, 2013

The indefatigable Joe Pompeo at Capital New York reports that the Times is reviewing its stable of blogs, and notes that its media blog doesn’t look long for this world:

Media Decoder hasn’t posted any content since April 14. For the time being, “they’ve moved all media coverage over to an article format,” according to a source familiar with the situation, who added: “I think it’s part of a broader effort to prune the blogs and push everything into our own new CMS, called Scoop. Better for the coming redesign that the paper has previewed.”

Asked about the status of Media Decoder, which had become a topic of interest among media wonks on Twitter these past few days, a Times spokesperson said the blog is “dormant, not dead.” Media editor Bruce Headlam was out of the office today and didn’t immediately respond to emails.

To be fair, most Times blogs have always been home to very article-y posts — the transition shouldn’t be a hard one to make.

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