Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 6, 2013, 12:27 p.m.
LINK: www.poynter.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 6, 2013

Apologies for the Australian football reference, but Rick Edmonds catches Fairfax CEO Greg Hywood saying print may have a shorter lifespan in Australia than some may think.

Talk about digital disruption. The CEO of Australia’s giant Fairfax Media said last week that he is preparing the company to abandon printed newspapers entirely “in three, five or 10 years.”

“Print revenues have been going down and are going down faster now,” Greg Hywood recently told the annual World Congress of the International News Media Association in New York. To the extent print newspapers have a future, he said, they will be “expensive, bespoke and narrowly distributed.”

Pressed on when Fairfax papers in Sydney and Melbourne might reduce frequency to a few days a week, Hywood declined to offer more specifics. He did add, however, that just dropping a day or two might have a minor impact on fixed costs, and “you can lose revenue without comparable savings.”

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
With higher education at the crossroads of the culture war, public media is vulnerable to growing political interference over its operations.
The view from here: Rethinking what local news can and should be
“Your newsroom should match the community. It’s the easiest thing to say, it’s very difficult to do.”
These competitors joined forces to allow readers to use a single login across their news sites
OneLog brings together some of the largest and most trusted Swiss media companies. Their single sign-on solution will reach 2 million active accounts in 2022 — representing one in four inhabitants in the country.