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Evoking empathy or seeking solidarity: Which is preferable when covering people without homes?
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May 30, 2013, 1:17 p.m.
LINK: www.interiordesign.net  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   May 30, 2013

Interior Design has a feature on NPR’s brand new headquarters, including all the digital bells and whistles:

Inside and out, the project is designed to tell the 43-year story of NPR the public-supported multimedia company, from its radio roots to present-day video, apps, and photojournalism. Visitors can hang out on a landscaped plaza and watch headlines scroll across the LED “ticker” mounted above the setback entrance. Or step inside the lobby, where a digital “media mosaic” is composed of floor-to-ceiling LED panels. Like oversize Android phone apps, LED tabs flash programming by and about NPR.

Behind this dynamic feature wall is  Studio One, NPR’s largest production space. At 2,400 square feet, it can be used to broadcast concerts, lectures, and theater-in-the-round or to host staff meetings—heck, perhaps badminton. Maple acoustical panels, harvested from the previous building, give a sense of warmth as they moderate the energy of the sound waves.

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