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As they shrink, are local newspapers protecting their “iron core” of local government coverage? This paper says no
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June 3, 2013, 12:49 p.m.
LINK: www.washingtonpost.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   June 3, 2013

Erik Wemple has a good take at The Washington Post, and Politico’s Dylan Byers has the memo. Wemple:

It’s a colossal move. Glasser is a big name in Washington journalism, fresh off of five years spent turning Foreign Policy into a digital force. The magazine had significant print bona fides at the time of its September 2008 purchase by The Washington Post Co., yet its Web presence lagged behind the standards of the time. Upon taking the job, Glasser quickly finished off a redo of foreignpolicy.com that had been in the works — and the magazine’s Web evolution hasn’t slowed since. According to a news release from the Foreign Policy Group, the magazine’s site tallied 4.4 million unique visitors in April, breaking readership records…

Glasser will have a twofold mandate at Politico: One is producing long-form pieces with significant gestation periods. Much of this stuff will land in a new Politico magazine that will come out at least six times per year, according to Politico Executive Editor Jim VandeHei. This magazine will be “stocked with profiles, investigative reporting and provocative analysis.” The other is to generate “of-the-moment” opinion pieces off of the news — kind of a faster-paced version of what Glasser did when she helmed the Outlook section of The Post. The goal is two such pieces per day.

We’ve written a number of times about Glasser’s work at FP.

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As they shrink, are local newspapers protecting their “iron core” of local government coverage? This paper says no
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