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Open or closed: Who will control the paid-podcast experience, podcasters or tech companies?
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July 30, 2013, 10:55 a.m.
LINK: www.youtube.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   July 30, 2013

Ray Daly of The Washington Post has been writing JavaScript since the 1990s. In May, he spoke at JSConf about “JavaScript journalism” — the idea that just as it took some time for photojournalism to be respected as a distinct field, it’s now proper to define JavaScript journalism as its own thing, a field ready to stand alongside the other prefixes journalists attach to their job titles.

(He stands up for JavaScript in particular — arguing that The New York Times’ Pulitzer for Snow Fall should have credited “its deft integration of JavaScript” rather than “its deft integration of multimedia elements.”)

Video of his talk was just posted to YouTube. His slides are here (using Hakim El Hattab’s lovely Reveal.js to format the presentation).

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