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July 25, 2013, 10:29 a.m.
LINK: www.journalism.co.uk  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   July 25, 2013

Journalism.co.uk’s Sarah Marshall reports that, for two days this month, BBC News got more traffic from mobile phones than from laptop/desktop computers.

Apparently, smartphone + tablet now routinely surpasses laptop + desktop traffic on the weekends. What made these two (weekend) days unique is that it was smartphones alone that beat their old-school antecedents. The death of actor Cory Monteith fueled one of those mobile-dominant days — another sign that young people in particular prefer news on their phones.

BBC News reports that smartphones typically account for 42 percent of its traffic. Back in November, that equivalent (also including tablets) was 37 percent at The New York Times, and I’ve no doubt their numbers today would be broadly similar. Fiona Spruill back then:

The numbers speak for themselves. In the next 12–18 months, many news organizations will cross the 50 percent threshold where more users are visiting on phones and tablets than on desktop computers and laptops.

In other words, it’s time to stop thinking of your desktop site as “the site” and your mobile site as some ancillary adjunct.

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