Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
This report sees journalistic “bias” less as partisanship and more as relying on too-comfortable habits
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
July 22, 2013, 2:06 p.m.

Alberto Ibargüen, president of Knight Foundation, made some comments about the history and strategy of their philanthropy around news innovation at the MIT-Knight Civic Media conference a few weeks ago. We wrote about it:

But the big news is what Knight Foundation CEO Alberto Ibargüen just said here in Cambridge at the opening morning of the 2013 MIT-Knight Civic Media Conference. He asked openly for ideas on what the future of the News Challenge should be, because, as he put it, “It may be finished. It may be that, as a device for doing something, it may be that we’ve gone as far as we can take it.”

Today, Knight released a report on their funding strategy that highlights the importance of framing grants around competition and contests. It’s the first in a series that suggests Knight is heading further down the path of introspection, trying to hone in on what makes for the most impactful giving. Here’s the gist:

Show tags
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
This report sees journalistic “bias” less as partisanship and more as relying on too-comfortable habits
“The first step is to accept that broad impartiality brings a stronger obligation to look.”
@nytimes is now on TikTok
“nytimes on the tok?! 🤩”
The first newspaper strike of the digital age stretches into a new year
When staff at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette walked off the job 100 days ago, they became the first newspaper to strike in decades. They’ve already been followed by more.