Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
News outlets will need public support to battle governments set on chilling investigative journalism
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Sept. 16, 2013, 1:24 p.m.
LINK: digiday.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   September 16, 2013

At Digiday, Josh Sternberg asked a number of digital publishing types what “mobile first” meant to them. Good answers from a number of them, but the answer from BuzzFeed’s Jon Steinberg (the headline of this post) stood out. (Plus a Vivian Schiller near-haiku!). Gawker CTO Media Thomas Plunkett:

At the high level, mobile-first means build where users are and where technology is going. In practice, we build features mobile-first. We simplify the product. It forces us to think about what is essential; extend features to desktop. We have a ton of work to do on the mobile-optimized payload front, but it comes down to tailoring dependencies (images, javascript, css, etc.) for mobile. It means adaptive design. We’re staying away from mobile specific templates.

Even within this small group of forward-thinking individuals, you can start to see the difference between the ones that are thinking mobile first and the ones who are acting mobile first.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
News outlets will need public support to battle governments set on chilling investigative journalism
Recent police raids against journalists in Australia and the United States seek to instill fear in the minds of journalists and their sources — less to punish the last story than to discourage the next one.
As the Christchurch massacre trial begins, New Zealand news orgs vow to keep white supremacist ideology out of their coverage
“We’re going to do our job — we won’t chill our coverage in any way — but we’re not going to spread hate or misinformation.”
Populists prefer television to online news — but are sticking to Facebook as others leave
“In the U.S., though there are some outlets with populist audiences — such as Fox and HuffPost — it is clear that the majority of outlets have audiences that are predominately non-populist left, such as The New York Times.”