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With elections looming worldwide, here’s how to identify and investigate AI audio deepfakes
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Sept. 23, 2013, 2:01 p.m.
LINK: www.mediapost.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   September 23, 2013

Jack Loechner at MediaPost has the details: In the short span from February 2010 to February 2013, U.S. Internet use moved from 451 billion minutes to 890 billion minutes.

Leading the way: smartphones (from 63 billion to 308 billion) and tablets (roughly zero to 115 billion).

Within the news category, 62 percent of online time is still on desktops and laptops, versus 31 percent on smartphones and 7 percent on tablets. The high desktop/laptop number makes sense — an awful lot of online news is consumed by deskbound office workers — but the tablet share has to be disappointing to all the news execs who bet the iPad would revive their business models.

Want to see the future for news? Look at the technology news category, where a full 77 percent of online time is on smartphones.

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