Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Don’t click this: When should news organizations use “nofollow” links?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Sept. 25, 2013, 1:20 p.m.
Business Models
LINK: revealradio.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   September 25, 2013

The Center for Investigative Reporting is partnering with PRX to produce a pilot for a radio show called Reveal. The hour-long show will focus on investigative reporting and the behind-the-scenes process of producing it. The pilot will air Sept. 28 on radio stations around the country. From CIR:

We know that the public cares about deeply reported stories that hold the powerful accountable and give voice to the voiceless. But too often, those stories come and go, and the public is left with questions: How did the story come about? What happened as a result? What’s the next step?

As we know, there is always more to the story.

“Reveal” will take listeners behind the scenes of investigations in progress, break national investigative stories and follow up on the impact and changes that result.

The pilot episode will break a big new national story, look into a new policing technology and much more. Its website will feature data apps, video and other ways for listeners to dive more deeply into the stories.

The collaboration began this summer: PRX provides the radio know-how, CIR supplies the investigative reporting. As PRX’s John Barth told Current, “We both came to the same realization that there is a gap around consistent investigative journalism in public radio.”

If the pilot is successful and stations show an interest, CIR and PRX plan to have the show ready to debut in 2014.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Don’t click this: When should news organizations use “nofollow” links?
Plus, a new free course for online fact-checking taught via workspace app Notion.
One potential route to flagging fake news at scale: Linguistic analysis
It’s not perfect, but legitimate and faked news articles use language differently in ways that can be detected algorithmically: “On average, fake news articles use more expressions that are common in hate speech, as well as words related to sex, death, and anxiety.”
Finally, Instagram is getting fact-checked (in a limited way and just in the U.S., for now)
“The potential to prevent harm is high here, particularly with the widespread existence of health misinformation on the platform.”