Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Here’s how The New York Times tested blockchain to help you identify faked photos on your timeline
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Oct. 30, 2013, 11:58 a.m.
LINK: espnmediazone.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   October 30, 2013

This is a couple days old, but worth noting nonetheless: In September, ESPN saw more unique visitors on mobile devices (47.4 million) than on the desktop version of ESPN.com (46.1 million). Time spent was almost even (44 percent mobile). Also, 36 percent of ESPN’s unique users accessed its digital content only on mobile devices.

(Interestingly, though, video still skewed desktop: 77 percent of clip views were on traditional computers, 16 percent on smartphones and tablets, and 6 percent on connected TVs.)

The push towards mostly mobile continues apace. We’ve gone from news sites having mostly mobile moments (like election night) to mostly mobile days or weekends (as The Guardian and BBC News have recently reported) to now mostly mobile months — which really just mean mostly mobile, period. ESPN is made for mobile in a lot of ways — real time sports updates are useful wherever you are, and attention paid to sports is probably less workday-hours-focused than much other online news — but this same trend will hit your news org sooner or later.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Here’s how The New York Times tested blockchain to help you identify faked photos on your timeline
“What we saw was a tendency to accept almost all images at first glance, regardless of subject area.”
Public infrastructure isn’t just bridges and water mains: Here’s an argument for extending the concept to digital spaces
“Our solutions cannot be limited to asking these platforms to do a better job of meeting their civic obligations — we need to consider what technologies we want and need for digital media to have a productive role in democratic societies.”
This former HBO executive is trying to use dramatic techniques to highlight the injustice in criminal justice
And hopefully to make some good TV along the way. Kary Antholis’ site Crime Story uses “a much more thematic, character-driven way of exploring these stories than how traditional media might pursue.”