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What I learned in my second year on Substack
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Oct. 16, 2013, 3:37 p.m.
LINK: matter.vc  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   October 16, 2013

The media-centric accelerator with public radio in its bones has selected its second class of startups. See our past stories about Matter and its first class.

Connu helps emerging writers find, connect with, and monetize audiences through publishing the best new short stories.

Contextly enables publications of all sizes to be both informative and viable in the age of drive-by readers by marrying editorial wisdom to the power of algorithms.

Creative Action Network is a marketplace for artists, causes and supporters to harness their talents for good by creating, buying and sharing original, crowdsourced creative content and merchandise.

Formidable Corp. bursts the filter bubble to help connect you to people outside of your social circle.

GetCast empowers creative professionals to take control of their careers by connecting them through a platform that helps them showcase their work, hone their craft, and collaborate on a global scale.

Hacklog empowers individual journalists to be more relevant to their audiences, impactful with their stories, and in charge of their careers by providing honest analytics.

Woopie (Write Only Once, Publish It Everywhere) empowers writers and publishers to easily reach their audiences on all devices and platforms through a digital content publishing tool focused on responsive design.

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What I learned in my second year on Substack
“I truly wish every reporter could have the experience of getting a raise on the same day they produced something of value to their readers.”
U.S. politicians tweet much more misinformation than those in the U.K. and Germany
“We also found systematic differences between the parties in the U.S., where Republican politicians were found to share untrustworthy websites more than nine times as often as Democratic politicians.”
“You don’t know which side is playing you”: The authors of Meme Wars have some advice for journalists
“The media treating Twitter like an assignment editor is one of the fundamental errors that enabled meme warriors to play everyone.”