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Why do some people avoid news? Because they don’t trust us — or because they don’t think we add value to their lives?
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Oct. 22, 2013, 10:42 a.m.
LINK: digiday.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   October 22, 2013

At Digiday, Jack Marshall surveys a few sites on their mobile traffic trends. What percentage of traffic comes from non-desktop/laptop devices?

At BuzzFeed, 50 percent.

At YouTube, 41 percent.

At Forbes, 35 percent.

At The Awl, 30 percent.

(At Nieman Lab, I can add, 26 percent — 18 percent smartphone, 8 percent tablet. Our audience disproportionately arrives via social, but it’s also disproportionately focused on workday hours when people are sitting in front of their computers.)

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