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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
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Oct. 30, 2013, 3:24 p.m.
Reporting & Production

The annual gathering of web makers and thinkers that is the Mozilla Festival wrapped up in London last weekend. One of the big additions to this year’s festival was an even larger dose of journalism and open data sessions, featuring a cast of characters likely familiar to Lab readers. (MozFest is also where the new class of Knight-Mozilla Fellows was announced.)

If you did not have a chance to make it to London, you’re in luck: Most of the talks have a collection of notes. Take a look through the schedule to see what interests you. (Select the festival track you’d like via the menu in the top right.) Here’s a few that caught our eye:

On the journalism track, there’s The New York Times’ Aron Pilhofer and Knight Lab’s Miranda Mulligan on incorporating design thinking into storytelling; a group of 2013 Knight-Mozilla fellows on tracking content and engagement; and a discussion about the Times, Guardian, and ProPublica collaborating to examine how the NSA circumvents encryption on the web.

On the data track, you’ll find the Times’ Derek Willis looking for ways to broaden the use of the OpenElections project; Travis Swicegood of The Texas Tribune on creating standards for sharing data; and former Knight-Mozilla fellows Dan Schultz and Mike Tigas on making data more accessible to the broader public.

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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
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