Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Yes, deepfakes can make people believe in misinformation — but no more than less-hyped ways of lying
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Oct. 17, 2013, 1:06 p.m.
LINK: www.freepress.net  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   October 17, 2013

Anytime there’s discussion of a shield law to protect journalists, the question immediately arises: Who counts as a journalist, anyway?

The by-now-commonplace response to that is to say we should be protecting acts of journalism, not a class of individuals labeled “journalists.” But defining what those acts are isn’t easy either.

That’s the context for this new paper from Free Press’ Josh Stearns, which tries to get at those issues:

In a new paper we’re releasing today, we profile some of these journalists and highlight the emerging consensus around a new vision for press freedom, one that protects all acts of journalism.

At its core is the idea that everyday Americans are central to the future of journalism as news consumers, distributors and creators. We need to push for policies that protect longstanding journalism institutions alongside these new participants…

Around the country people are committing acts of journalism that are serving their communities, influencing national debates and changing the face of journalism. As our understanding of journalism changes, so too must our understanding of press freedom.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Yes, deepfakes can make people believe in misinformation — but no more than less-hyped ways of lying
The reasons we get fooled by political lies are less about the technology behind their production and more about the mental processes that lead us to trust or mistrust, accept or discount, embrace or ignore.
Do you know the McMuffin man?
Capitol coverage, the problem with op-eds, and that Vogue cover.
Tiny News Collective aims to launch 500 new local news organizations in three years
At least half of the new newsrooms will be “based in communities that are unserved or underserved, run by founders who have historically been shut out.”