Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Small steps, but: Most big American newspaper newsrooms are now led by someone other than a white man
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Dec. 4, 2013, 2:57 p.m.

You might have heard that paying for good reporting and quality journalism is not easy.

Today many pixels were spilled over Jessica Lessin’s new attempt to do just that. This morning, she launched a long-awaited tech news site called The Information, which will be available to subscribers only for the cost of $39 a month or $399 a year. Jokes of all stripes were made about the wisdom of such an enterprise.

Carlson, for his part, went on to write that, though he believes Lessin’s project will most likely end in profit, he himself had no qualms about republishing the work of her reporters and making it freely available to readers via Business Insider. Not everyone found this sentiment charming.

Meanwhile, across the Internet, another fight about journalism, capitalism, and the right to information. Writes The New Inquiry’s Mal Harris:

Which led Awl editor Choire Sicha to respond:

The ensuing debate focused on the ethics of JSTOR, a company that charges for access to scholarly papers, with Harris arguing that putting academic output behind a paywall is inherently unethical (therefore making it unethical for The Awl to accept money from them) and Sicha arguing that it was universities that “enclose” academic work (and therefore not his problem).

Overall, another day in the how-to-pay-for-news debate.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Small steps, but: Most big American newspaper newsrooms are now led by someone other than a white man
Among the 20 biggest dailies, nearly two-thirds of their newsrooms are run by a woman or a person of color (or both). But newsrooms still have a long way to go to be reflective of the communities they serve.
Female video game journalists on what to do when the mob comes for you
“Remember 98% of the time the people harassing you are not attempting to engage with your work in good faith.”
Nothing against the “Death Star,” but the LA Times thinks its new daily news podcast can go where the biggies can’t
“When you say national, usually what that means is New York or D.C. We’re trying to read that so that the gravity is really coming out of Southern California and expanding outward from that.”