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The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
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March 26, 2014, 11:20 a.m.

Last fall, we told you about Year Zero, a new program out of Columbia’s j-school aimed at providing a grounding in data concepts — coding, databases, algorithms, and the like — to journalists and other humanities-ish types.

Well, the program was officially announced last night, and now it’s got a new name: The Lede Program. (I’d wager that some of the non-journalists in the program will wonder who the generous Mr. Lede was who got his name attached to it.)

Data, code and algorithms are becoming central to research and creative work, and are setting new parameters for the exercise of responsible citizenship. Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism and Department of Computer Science have together created two new post-bac certification programs that will offer hands-on training in data and data technologies, all taught in the context of journalism, the humanities and the social sciences. These programs assume no prior experience in these topics and, in fact, are explicitly aimed at students with little or no formal training in computation and data.

Courses are here. The Lede Program can be done either as a summer-only program or as a summer/fall combo, with more advanced courses in computer science in the second term.

The price tag for the summer session, which leads to a Certification of Professional Achievement? $13,456, not counting your living expenses in New York.

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