Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Why do people share misinformation about Covid-19? Partly because they’re distracted
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Aug. 12, 2014, 11:01 a.m.
Business Models
LINK: www.phillymag.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   August 12, 2014

We don’t spend a lot of time focusing on what happened to the American newspaper industry in the first decade-plus of this century — what’s past is past! — but this piece by Joel Mathis in Philadelphia magazine is a useful visual reminder. They obtained an internal document from the company that owns The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News detailing the decline in the papers’ financial state from 2000 to 2012. (One presumes the document comes from the financial data distributed to potential buyers of the papers in that last year.)

You can go there to see the plummeting totals and get some more context. But I think you’ll get the point with these two charts:

philadelphia-inquirer-daily-news-decline

philadelphia-inquirer-daily-news-profit

(One gloss on that first chart: You might see the difference between “Print Ads” and “Total Ads” and assume the difference is online advertising. That’s part of it, but the significantly larger part is preprint advertising — mostly the loose circulars that get packed in with the Sunday paper. Yeah, that’s all printed too, but it’s not included in the “Print Ads” segment above.)

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Why do people share misinformation about Covid-19? Partly because they’re distracted
Plus: Misinformation around Black Lives Matter protests and an analysis of the most-shared COVID-19 misinformation in Europe.
Tribune can buy more time by selling more control to Alden Global Capital
The vulture fund may be just fine with waiting a bit longer to make its next move to consolidate the local newspaper industry. Meanwhile, newsrooms wait.
A year and a half in, The Juggernaut challenges mainstream media’s coverage of South Asians
“The fastest growing demographic in America right now is Asian Americans and, more specifically, South Asian Americans. But when you look at the media coverage that we have, it’s disproportionately low.”