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July 10, 2015, 1:23 p.m.
LINK: blog.linkedin.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   July 10, 2015

More than a million people have now published a post on LinkedIn, the company announced Thursday (about 18 months after opening up its publishing tools):

Our over 1 million unique publishers publish more than 130,000 posts a week on LinkedIn. About 45% of readers are in the upper ranks of their industries: managers, VPs, CEOs, etc. The top content-demanding industries are tech, financial services and higher education. The average post now reaches professionals in 21 industries and 9 countries.

The post also includes a list of editor-recommended LinkedIn posts:

linkedin editor recommends

But here’s the SEO-friendly list of what people are actually reading:

linkedin most read

The difference in those lists suggests a conflict at LinkedIn. It wants to be more upmarket, Medium-ish. But it is also thriving by being annoying.

LinkedIn is a notorious over-emailer. My highly unscientific “Twitter sense” suggests a recent increase in complaints about way too many LinkedIn notifications:

And an only-slightly-less-scientific Google trend search suggests that, indeed, people have become more annoyed by LinkedIn in each month of this year:

LinkedIn is at least aware of user complaints and appears to have started rolling out some changes.

“We have been making improvements across our email experience and are continuing to explore new ways to do this. As part of this effort, members who receive more invitation emails than most, will start to see a weekly email with a summary of invitations instead of individual emails,” the company told me Thursday. So, at least if you are really popular, you may get spammed less. The rest of us might have to wait.

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