Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Google now wants to answer your questions without links and with AI. Where does that leave publishers?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Aug. 25, 2015, 12:52 p.m.
Mobile & Apps
LINK: wn.wsj.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Shan Wang   |   August 25, 2015

WSJnews-screenshotWhat’s News, The Wall Street Journal’s new digest app designed specifically for mobile subscribers launched today for iOS, on top of the existing catchall Journal app. (The new app is iOS-only, but the company intends to roll out an Android version later this year).

When we first previewed the app a few weeks ago, the Journal’s chief innovation officer Edward Roussel said the app was one of the company’s many new efforts to “think digital” and “think mobile,” in order to attract — and retain — subscribers.

“This is the first WSJ product truly for mobile,” Roussel said. “Twenty years ago, we were shoehorning the newspaper into web. In 2007, we began shoehorning that into a mobile device. And now mobile is becoming dominant — that’s the premise.”

An accompanying (mobile-optimized) morning briefing, which highlights in more detail “what to watch” for the morning and “what you missed” lives online and encourages readers to download the app or subscribe to the Journal.

Show tags
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Google now wants to answer your questions without links and with AI. Where does that leave publishers?
A dozen years ago, Eric Schmidt forecast the AI pivot that’s playing out this week. And the questions it prompts — around the link economy, fair use, and aggregation — are more real than ever.
A journalistic lesson for an algorithmic age: Let the scientific method be your guide
“One of the best parts about using the scientific method as a guide is that it moves us beyond the endless debates about whether journalism is ‘fair’ or ‘objective.’ Rather than focus on fairness, it’s better to focus on what you know and what you don’t know.”
The future of local news is “civic information,” not “declining legacy systems,” says new report
“In this vision, the community librarian facilitating conversations around authoritative, trusted digital news is as celebrated as the dogged reporter pursuing a scoop.”