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Sept. 22, 2015, 1:06 p.m.
LINK: daringfireball.net  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   September 22, 2015

Daring Fireball’s John Gruber linked yesterday to a Sports Illustrated slideshow of baseball photos taken with the new iPhone 6s Plus. But he noted a technical problem:

In a small dose of irony, I had to disable content-blocking (long press the reload button in Mobile Safari’s location field) to get SI’s image gallery dingus to work.

In other words, the adblocking software Gruber has installed on his iPhone was also blocking the content.

Now, if a publisher chooses to do that — to block access to its content to those using adblockers — that’s its prerogative! It might be a smart choice that leads to whitelisting, or at least plants a few guilty feelings. Or it might just lead people to be angry with no positive outcomes! We’ll see.

My point here is that it should be a conscious choice, not the result of bad code.

(Justen Fox is a senior product manager at Vox Media. Acronym decoder: JS = JavaScript, DFP = Google’s ad platform DoubleClick for Publishers, NR = analytics platform New Relic. From a little Ghostery fiddling, it looks like it’s blocking DoubleClick that breaks the slideshow. I’ve also seen some wonky, broken behavior on some other news sites.)

Again, I’m not saying publishers shouldn’t feel free to deal with adblockers however they’d like; as an industry, it’s healthy for different publishers to respond in different ways so we can compare results. But it’s worth it to run through your site with adblockers on, desktop and mobile, just to see what that share of your audience is seeing. You need that information to make sound judgments.

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