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April 14, 2016, 5:25 p.m.

isojMost of the Nieman Lab staff is down in Austin for the 2016 International Symposium on Online Journalism. It’s probably my favorite journalism conference each year — a great mix of journalists, publishers, and academics, with a lot of international voices from Europe, Asia, and especially Latin America. (If you’re in Austin, we’re hosting a happy hour tonight — 5:30 to 7:30 at the Hole in the Wall, 2538 Guadalupe Street. Come say hi!)

In the past, we’ve provided live coverage of ISOJ, but this year, we’re trying something different: a special Nieman Lab Slack just for the conference. We’re calling it the Nieman Lab Lounge. Think of it as an unofficial backchannel, for those in attendance and those who want to follow along at home.

Here’s what you do: Go here to sign up for an account on our Slack. Login information will be sent to your email, then you can join the Slack here or in the Slack apps on your Mac, PC, iOS, or Android device. We’ll all be talking about the presentations, the issues being discussed, and most likely at least once, tacos. Join us!

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