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“Big tech is watching you. Who’s watching big tech?” The Markup is finally ready for liftoff
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Nov. 16, 2016, 11:30 a.m.
Mobile & Apps

imrsStarting today, if you’re in an Uber and open up The Washington Post’s classic app, you’ll be able to read articles while also monitoring how much time is left to your destination.

Maybe you didn’t know that this was something you wanted to do. But “we think Uber has the potential to present a news experience tailored for transit,” said Adam Levy, the Post’s product manager. “As a service to our readers, we’re helping to eliminate the back-and-forth task of reading the news and checking an Uber app for the status of a trip, something we encounter daily.”

The Washington Post is also launching an unlimited digital access offer that will give users the ability to view as many articles as they want for free while they’re on their ride. “We’re still finalizing the specific terms of the offer, but the paywall will be suspended for a time frame of up to 30 days,” said Shani George, the Post’s director of communications.

In future iterations of integration, the Post will explore other features for the app (I’d asked about articles timed to the trip’s length, for instance). For now, the integration is available only in the Washington Post’s classic mobile app.

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