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What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
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May 24, 2017, 1:24 p.m.
LINK: www.news.co.uk  ➚   |   Posted by: Shan Wang   |   May 24, 2017

The Times of London is expanding its Irish edition from digital into print, a move that bucks against a continued trend of declining daily print sales in the country and elsewhere.

The Times launched its digital-only Ireland edition in September 2015 (after a failed legal challenge from the Irish Times to block News UK from using the name “The Times Irish Edition”). It has a substantial newsroom of around 30 reporters. Its new print edition will replace the international print version of The Times that’s currently available there; readers can pick up the first print copies June 3.

News Ireland has not disclosed pricing for the print edition; the current digital edition costs new subscribers €1 for a 30-day trial, and then €5 a week thereafter.

“We have built a loyal digital audience for the Ireland edition of The Times and we are now delighted to expand what we offer to include more Irish news, business, sport, opinion and analysis in print as well,” Richard Oakley, editor of the Ireland edition, said in a statement. “The Ireland edition of The Times is a quality Irish newspaper with a global outlook.”

(Not all of The Times’ experiments beyond the U.K.’s borders have worked out: The Times shuttered its paid international app, targeted at a global audience, back in September.)

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