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From newsroom to newsletter: How local journalists are DIYing important coverage via email
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Sept. 6, 2017, 11:48 a.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: qz.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Ricardo Bilton   |   September 6, 2017

Since its launch in 2012, Quartz has pushed the envelope with new ideas in distribution, visualization, and the general relationship between reporting and technology. Now, as it’s celebrating its five-year anniversary, it’s introducing a few more.

Over the next two months, the site will launch a pair of new, subject-focused editions to join its main site: Quartz at Work, launching in October, will expand the site’s coverage of management and the workplace, topics that have already proven to be particularly popular among Quartz readers. Joining the edition in November will be Quartzy, a life and culture site focused on topics such as fashion, food, and entertainment that builds on the newsletter of the same name that launched in 2016. Quartz seems to be putting significant resources into the new editions, both of which will be staffed by their own dedicated teams of reporters.

Quartz also announced today that it’s published The Objects that Power the Global Economy, a $35 hardcover book that features original reporting, photos, and data visualizations from Quartz reporters. Editor-in-chief Kevin Delaney said that the effort is the result of thinking about how Quartz’s “approach to journalism and visual storytelling might manifest itself in print, taking unique advantage of the physical form,” as he wrote in a post this morning.

Rounding out Quartz’s announcements, Quartz plans to launch a trio of new video series: “On the Edge”, “In the Deep,” and “What Happens Next,” which will focus on the world’s unexplored locations, the mysteries of the sea, and the future of technology, respectively.

Quartz’s embrace of new ideas over the past few years (which we’ve covered extensively) is, in a real sense, the editorial reflection of its broader ambition to build a news organization that “would challenge assumptions, embrace technological change, and stand for a more open and connected world,” as Delaney writes in the post announcing the new products.

Quartz was founded, in part, to champion the values of a new global economy. We believe that the open movement of people, ideas, and goods is the most powerful cure for war and economic stagnation. We’ve argued throughout for lucid, compassionate policies that acknowledge the downsides of globalization and technological advances, but our conviction is that the world is better off with fewer barriers to trade, immigration, and the exchange of ideas among people. Despite major setbacks in recent years, our staff, spread among five continents, remains emboldened by the importance of this mission. And we know you do, too.

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