Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Publishers hope fact-checking can become a revenue stream. Right now, it’s mostly Big Tech who is buying.
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 23, 2018, 11:26 a.m.
LINK: www.algorithmic.news  ➚   |   Posted by: Christine Schmidt   |   May 23, 2018

Even if automation is creeping into all corners of our lives, at least we humans can still get together in real life to talk about it.

At the Algorithms, Automation, and News conference in Munich this week, some of journalism’s biggest brainiacs shared their research on everything from bot behavior to showing your work when it’s automated to reporting through the Internet of Things. Many of academics’ relevant papers will be published in a forthcoming issue of Digital Journalism. (Full list of presenters, panelists, and papers here.)

Algorithmic accountability — reverse-engineering and reporting on the algorithms across our lives, from Facebook to Airbnb to targeted job listings — is a hot topic in journalism, but this conference focused more on the silver linings: how automation and algorithms could bolster newsrooms full of human journalists.

Here are some of the top tweets from the Munich mind-gathering:

The Associated Press’ director of information management Stuart Myles walked attendees through the AP’s process for making automation in news more transparent (hint: it includes automating transparency):

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Publishers hope fact-checking can become a revenue stream. Right now, it’s mostly Big Tech who is buying.
Facebook alone works with 80 different fact-checking organizations worldwide.
Fewer grants, more risks: Four rules for nonprofit journalism funders, from the former president of ProPublica
“Any national donor large enough to put out press releases that issues one about making a bunch of $25,000 grants is either trying to fool other people or themselves.”
As Facebook tries to knock the journalism off its platform, its users are doing the same
A healthy chunk of Facebook users say they don’t get much news there any more — an outcome to be both expected and desired.