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Nov. 19, 2018, 10:05 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: twitter.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Christine Schmidt   |   November 19, 2018

In recent years, engaged journalism — including and asking audiences and communities to be involved in a news organization’s reporting process — has become a bit of a sub-culture of the industry. One hallmark of the journey is the People-Powered Publishing Conference hosted by Illinois Humanities each fall for the past few years, aiming to shift more engagement practices into mainstream journalism practices. It looks a little like this:

Questions still remain about the metrics judging the effectiveness of engagement work, but the resources and projects highlighted in this year’s conference show that each year, engagement work gets closer to sussing that out: Philadelphia media’s Broke in Philly collaboration focused on economic mobility, Free Press’s organizer guide for journalists, Dr. Michelle Ferrier and Fiona Morgan’s work on media deserts and asset-based community development, the Engaged Journalism Accelerator’s database of 70-plus European engagement projects, and this presentation by Hearken/Groundsource and other engagement enablers (see the “ROIsetta Stone” slide for ways to bring the conversation about engagement into common terms for the public, editorial, and business sides — also read the meaty footnotes through the slides).

Here are other top thoughts shared during the conference:

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