Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Twitter says it wants to solve the “journalists’ careers end because someone digs up an old tweet” problem
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
April 15, 2019, 1:09 p.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: twitter.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Christine Schmidt   |   April 15, 2019

The business model is still a problem. Misinformation is still a problem. Media manipulation is still a problem. But 250 reporters gathered (at Google’s Chicago office, no less) to talk about how to improve the journalism that they’re doing on a regular basis on the campaign trail — what they can control, as Marty Baron has said, as they are at work, not at war.

This was the Campaign Journalism Conference, put on by the Nieman Foundation and the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics, in its second iteration. But when the same conference happened four years ago, the name “Donald Trump” — surprise, surprise — hardly came up. Obviously things were a bit different this go-round.

Now the man has shaken journalism and journalists for the trends that they missed, or dismissed, in 2016. Countless diner stories and Trump voter profiles have swamped newsrooms as many scrambled to make up for lost ground, and trust. We haven’t seen the full stretch of campaign reporting yet, but as over 300 campaign events have already taken place in Iowa (conveniently tracked by the Des Moines Register), it’s not too late to course-correct coverage looking forward. (There are more candidates than the B-Boys! Stop the horserace!)

So it’s time to get to work — and work differently than in 2016. The Campaign Journalism Conference serves as an introductory point to many first-time campaign reporters, sharing tips on how to pack a bag for the campaign trail, interact with press secretaries, and read polls. But it also can be a gauge on how news organizations are anticipating doing the election’s coverage differently, with speakers from HuffPost, BuzzFeed News, CNN, The Nevada Independent, and more sharing their takeaways.

Here’s how journalists are thinking about reporting differently in the lead-up to November 3, 2020:

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Twitter says it wants to solve the “journalists’ careers end because someone digs up an old tweet” problem
“These are some of the biggest reasons why people don’t tweet. Which is why we actually take this very seriously.”
Can Spotify be the one to finally get people listening to short podcasts?
Plus: ESPN jumps into the daily flagship audio game, the podcast book tour, and more impeachment podcasts.
In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
A strategy of “capturing the main professionals from the newspapers, in their respective fields of work, and thus reduce the tensions of being disturbed by the journalists every single day.” “Memory is crucial for journalism, and we are losing it.”