Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Prism, a news site led by women of color, centers the voices of marginalized people in its reporting
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Nov. 12, 2019, 11:51 a.m.
Mobile & Apps

Along with a redesign, The Atlantic launched a revamped iOS app Tuesday.

The iOS-only app starts off with a “Today” screen, curated and written by humans, which users can scan for free. The newsletter-iness of that section is intentional, said Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor. The text in the Today screen changes according to the time of day; depending on when you’re reading, you’ll be greeted with “Good morning,” “Good afternoon,” “Good evening,” or “Still awake?”

That Today screen is free, but to click through to any of the articles or to read any of the app’s other content, users will have to pay. (The Atlantic’s website, in comparison, has a metered paywall; visitors can read five stories free per month before they have to pay.) Most of the users of The Atlantic’s app are subscribers anyway, said Andrew Phelps, senior director of product (and a Nieman Lab alum): “Our app audience is the most loyal and engaged of any surface where we reach people. Something like three out of four come to the app at least three times a week, and that was to an app that largely just looked like the homepage of The Atlantic. Until now, it hasn’t been terribly different.” But those who aren’t paying yet can subscribe to the app for either $4.99 per month or $49.99 per year.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Prism, a news site led by women of color, centers the voices of marginalized people in its reporting
“If you’re going to shift narratives in this country, you need people to actually read what you’re doing.”
Is Facebook too big to know? The Markup has a plan (and a browser) to wrap its arms around it
The Citizen Browser Project will pay 1,200 Americans to let The Markup monitor the choices that tech company algorithms are making for them. “What are they choosing to amplify? And what are they choosing not to amplify?”
Facebook and YouTube’s moves against QAnon are only a first step in the battle against dangerous conspiracy theories
Get ready for “lighter propaganda.”