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Spanish-language misinformation is flourishing — and often hidden. Is help on the way?
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Jan. 29, 2020, 12:37 p.m.
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The Guardian has been steps ahead of any other major news organization in terms of the way it thinks about its coverage of climate change — which it actually now refers to as “climate emergency, crisis, or breakdown” — as an organization. Five years ago, it divested oil, coal, and gas companies from its investment fund, it’s vowed to achieve net zero emissions by 2030 and got certified as a B corporation, and on Wednesday it continued the trend: It announced it will no longer accept advertising from oil or gas companies in any of its properties, digital or print.

From “climate change” to “climate emergency, crisis or breakdown”: The Guardian is changing the environmental language it uses ]

“Our decision is based on the decades-long efforts by many in [the fossil fuels industry] to prevent meaningful climate action by governments around the world,” the Guardian’s acting CEO Anna Bateson and chief revenue officer Hamish Nicklin said in a joint statement. (Bateson, by the way, will be succeeded by Annette Thomas — who holds a Ph.D in cell biology and neuroscience — in March.)

Other news organizations have taken, um, heat for publishing investigations into the climate crisis on the editorial side while continuing to run advertising and branded content from fossil fuel companies. Here, for instance, is an exchange last month between environmental journalist Amy Westervelt and New York Times climate reporter John Schwartz.

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