Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 6, 2021, 1:03 p.m.
Audience & Social
LINK:   ➚   |   Posted by: Hanaa' Tameez   |   May 6, 2021

Twitter is rolling out a new feature that prompts users to revise their tweet replies if the language in them can be considered offensive (the algorithm aims to detect “insults, strong language, or hateful remarks”).

Twitter has made several moves over the last year to improve safety on the platform and curb misinformation. What’s exciting, or at the least a cause for optimism, is that in experiments last year, Twitter says 34% of users who saw the prompt revised their initial replies or decided to not send the tweet at all. Then, after seeing the prompt, people wrote 11% fewer offensive replies.

For now, the feature will only be available to Twitter users who use the platform in English on both iOS and Android devices. It stops short of preventing someone from sending an offensive or harmful reply all together.

“We’ll continue to explore how prompts — such as reply prompts and article prompts — and other forms of intervention can encourage healthier conversations on Twitter,” the official announcement said. “Our teams will also collect feedback from people on Twitter who have received reply prompts as we expand this feature to other languages.”

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
“We don’t have to turn around a whole big ship. We can try things.”
The Mississippi Free Press launched early to cover the pandemic, but aims to be in nonprofit news “for the long game”
“If you seem to be an organization that’s only concerned with large donors and large foundations, you’re probably only concerned with one type of reporting.”
Publishers hope fact-checking can become a revenue stream. Right now, it’s mostly Big Tech who is buying.
Facebook alone works with 80 different fact-checking organizations worldwide.