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Postcards and laundromat visits: The Texas Tribune audience team experiments with IRL distribution
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Feb. 9, 2022, 2:23 p.m.
Business Models
LINK: www.wsj.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   February 9, 2022

Dotdash Meredith — it’s the name of the company as of December — will cease print publications of six magazines, some more (once?) beloved than others: Entertainment Weekly, InStyle, EatingWell, Health, Parents, and People en Español. About 200 staffers will lose jobs, though some may find new jobs within the company. April will be the last print issue for the six magazines, The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

“Naysayers will interpret this as another nail in print’s coffin,” Dotdash Meredith CEO Neil Vogel said in his memo to staff. “They couldn’t be more wrong.”

The company owns 19 remaining print magazines, including People and Real Simple.

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