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When it comes to launching serious, sustainable membership programs for journalism, ask for more, more often, and aim higher
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Aug. 21, 2013, 2:38 p.m.
LINK: gigaom.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   August 21, 2013

That’s beginning next month. HuffPost has maintained one of the most voluminous and active comment communities since launch: 260 million comments in all, with readers leaving as many as 25,000 comments an hour at times. But the vitriol and bad behavior of the anonymous crowd has become too much, according to Arianna Huffington. Speaking at a conference earlier today, via Giga OM:

“I feel that freedom of expression is given to people who stand up for what they say and not hiding behind anonymity,” she said. “we need to evolve a platform to meet the needs of the grown-up Internet,” she said.

It’s unclear yet what method the site will use to identify commenters or whether they will follow the lead of other sites and use Facebook or Twitter credentials.

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When it comes to launching serious, sustainable membership programs for journalism, ask for more, more often, and aim higher
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