Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Two out of two news organizations recommend user research
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
April 17, 2014, 12:58 p.m.
Mobile & Apps
LINK: www.mobilemarketer.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   April 17, 2014

The New York Times is betting there is an overlap between Starbucks customers and Times readers. The paper is partnering with Starbucks to help boost the fortunes of the newly launched NYT Now app.

Anyone who is a member of the My Starbucks Rewards program is eligible to get 12 weeks of free access to the app. The promotion makes a lot of sense given the fact that NYT Now is the Times attempt at targeting mobile-centric users. My Starbucks Rewards encourages coffee lovers to pay for their drinks and gain rewards through using an app on their phone.

The overall goal of the collaboration seems to be to push more people to give NYT Now a try, whether they’re existing Times susbcribers or new readers. From Mobile Marketer:

Starbucks is promoting the partnership through an email blast that was sent to all My Starbucks Rewards members.

When consumers click through on the email, they are prompted to either sign-in to their New York Times account or create an account. After logging in, consumers type in a 20-digit unique code that is in the email to begin their free trial of NYT Now.

This is not the first time the Times has thought coffee and news would make for a good combination. In February 2013 the Times and Starbucks started offering readers free nytimes.com stories to people using Starbucks wifi network.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Two out of two news organizations recommend user research
Here’s how ProPublica and The New York Times are pioneering user experience research within their organizations.
A new app from NowThis wants to reduce the work of finding news to one big red button
Paralyzed by having to choose what news story to turn your attention to next? Tap For News keeps “everything super, super simple” by eliminating that choice.
“Modern” homepage design increases pageviews and reader comprehension, study finds
A new report from the Engaging News Project shows that users prefer modular, image-heavy homepage designs.
What to read next
1119
tweets
New Pew data: More Americans are getting news on Facebook and Twitter
A new study from the Pew Research Center and Knight Foundation finds that more Americans of all ages, races, genders, education levels, and incomes are using Twitter and Facebook to consume news.
691Newsonomics: The halving of America’s daily newsrooms
If you’re lucky enough to have the right deep-pocketed owner buy your paper and steady it, you’ve won the lottery. If you’re in a town whose paper is owned by the better chains, or committed local ownership, your loss will probably be mitigated. Otherwise, you’re out of luck.
551“Modern” homepage design increases pageviews and reader comprehension, study finds
A new report from the Engaging News Project shows that users prefer modular, image-heavy homepage designs.
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Conde Nast
PBS NewsHour
The Batavian
National Review
Suck.com
TBD
Texas Tribune
The Blaze
OpenFile
Google
CBS News
Amazon