Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 4, 2012, 10:25 a.m.
LINK: www.shirky.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   January 4, 2012

A new post from Clay Shirky, sure to be widely read:

To understand newspapers’ 15-year attachment to paywalls, you have to understand “Everyone must pay!” not just as an economic assertion, but as a cultural one. Though the journalists all knew readership would plummet if their paper dropped imported content like Dear Abby or the funny pages, they never really had to know just how few people were reading about the City Council or the water main break. Part of the appeal of paywalls, even in the face of their economic ineffectiveness, was preserving this sense that a coupon-clipper and a news junkie were both just customers, people whose motivations the paper could serve in general, without having to understand in particular.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
With higher education at the crossroads of the culture war, public media is vulnerable to growing political interference over its operations.
The view from here: Rethinking what local news can and should be
“Your newsroom should match the community. It’s the easiest thing to say, it’s very difficult to do.”
These competitors joined forces to allow readers to use a single login across their news sites
OneLog brings together some of the largest and most trusted Swiss media companies. Their single sign-on solution will reach 2 million active accounts in 2022 — representing one in four inhabitants in the country.