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Feb. 28, 2013, 2:39 p.m.
LINK: paidcontent.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   February 28, 2013

At paidContent, Jeff John Roberts writes about what The Atlantic learned from its Scientology snafu — mainly, apparently, that it doesn’t get to play the same game the Gawkers and Vices of the world do:

“The biggest mistake in retrospect was that it wasn’t harmonious to our site and it didn’t bring any value to our readers,” said VP and General Manager Kimberly Lau, at the event, which was hosted by native ad shop Sharethrough. “The second mistake was allowing the marketing team to moderate comments in a way that wasn’t transparent.”

Lau’s comments echo the Atlantic’s earlier apologies for the incident which, by all appearances, was a one-off mistake. But her remarks stand out because of where she made them: on a panel with representatives from Gawker, Vice and College Humor — three publications that regularly mix advertising into their editorial process and that expressed sympathy for the Atlantic’s predicament.

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