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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
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March 20, 2013, 11:51 a.m.

Advertisers have been slow to embrace mobile advertising. According to the MIT Technology Review, “The average cost an advertiser pays to show an ad to a thousand people on a desktop computer is $3.50, but it’s only 75 cents on mobile devices, according to estimates from the venture capital firm Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield, and Byers.”

It’s hard to track a viewer’s behavior on mobile — cookies don’t work as reliably, and users are increasingly toggling back and forth between devices depending on their task. But not for long:

Technology companies are now rushing to fill the infrastructure gap that’s preventing mobile ads from becoming truly valuable. Google has filed patents on ideas for how to link mobile ad campaigns to data about people’s real-world purchases, and one alumnus of Google’s ad business recently raised $6.5 million in funding for her company, Drawbridge, whose technology allows marketers to follow consumers from one device to another (see “Get Ready for Ads That Follow You from One Device to the Next.”).

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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
A strategy of “capturing the main professionals from the newspapers, in their respective fields of work, and thus reduce the tensions of being disturbed by the journalists every single day.” “Memory is crucial for journalism, and we are losing it.”
Focus here, not there: These are the gaps in political misinformation research
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How are paywalled news outlets preparing to serve residents in California’s mega-power shutoffs?
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