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Being skeptical of sources is a journalist’s job — but it doesn’t always happen when those sources are the police
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April 1, 2013, 2:22 p.m.
LINK: paidcontent.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   April 1, 2013

Mathew Ingram sums up the high points of Ken Auletta’s New Yorker profile of Business Insider boss Henry Blodget. BI lost about $3 million last year:

And what does the future hold for Business Insider? An unidentified board member tells Auletta that he expects the site to be acquired, and Blodget says it “either will become part of a larger enterprise or become the larger enterprise.”

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Being skeptical of sources is a journalist’s job — but it doesn’t always happen when those sources are the police
As a scholar who researches media coverage of police and protests, I believe Toledo’s death exposes a blind spot in journalism: a tendency to go with the “police said” narrative without outwardly questioning if it is right.
Block Club Chicago offered two versions of the same breaking news story — with and without a horrifying video
Readers told the nonprofit local newsroom that they appreciated the option to read an article omitting graphic video and images of 13-year-old Adam Toledo’s death.
Substack will spend $1 million to support “up to 30” local news writers
“This is not a grants program, nor is it inspired by philanthropic intent.”