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Facebook’s intentions may not be pure, but its money is real: How publishers made the most of its membership accelerator
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May 23, 2013, 12:45 p.m.
LINK: source.mozillaopennews.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 23, 2013

Building on our piece on the Reuters.com rethink, Source went back to get the nerdier details from Paul Smalera. Of note is that it’s all built on an API called Media Connect (see comment below) that generates the content feeds for all its new platforms and products:

The other thing this setup lets us do is show off the depth of Reuters content. We produce, including videos, text, pictures, and other content types, something like 20,000 unique items per day. But our current website really didn’t let us show off the depth of our reporting. So one of the main functions of the CMS is really set up to allow editors to create and curate collections — we call them streams — of stories. This lets us get to the endless-scroll type behavior that Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, and the rest have made popular as the new default behavior of the web.

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