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Yes, deepfakes can make people believe in misinformation — but no more than less-hyped ways of lying
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June 5, 2013, 10:25 a.m.
LINK: www.washingtonpost.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   June 5, 2013

The Washington Post released more details about its forthcoming digital subscription plan, which will go into effect on June 12. Digital-only access to the Post’s desktop and mobile site will be $9.99 a month. For $14.99 digital-only subscribers can get access to mobile, desktop, and all of the Post’s apps. Non-subscribers will get 20 free views on the site, and “visitors who come to The Post through search engines or shared links will still be able to access the linked page regardless of the number of articles they have previously viewed.”

As at The New York Times, there’ll be no paywall around the Post’s videos, since video advertising is one of the bright spots in newspapers’ revenue mix.

One interesting part of the Post’s plan is that it leaves the door wide open for certain groups of people beyond print subscribers:

The plan will not affect substantial numbers of The Post’s readers, who will continue to have unlimited free access online. They include people who subscribe to home delivery of the print edition as well as students, teachers, school administrators, government employees and military personnel who sign on from their schools or workplaces.

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