Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
A bakery, a brewery, and a local news site: There’s a new type of collective growing in Spokane, Washington
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 1, 2014, 2:34 p.m.
LINK: www.politico.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 1, 2014

As part of its new media issue, Politico Magazine has a Susan Glasser interview with Bill Keller (ex-New York Times) and Marcus Brauchli (ex-Washington Post, ex-Wall Street Journal) in which they give their take on the changing media world.

On paywalls, Keller:

I was executive editor for eight years. We probably spent six of those years worrying about what the business model would be. And we looked at everything. We looked at every variation of pay models. We looked at micropayments, we looked at nonprofit status even, for God’s sake — we looked at everything. Should we have done it [launched a paywall] earlier? I don’t know. I mean, yeah, we could have done it earlier, it might have helped, but we did it early enough.

And Brauchli:

There was a strong sense that having a large audience was vital to the Post’s success and relevance, and even today with the paywall as it’s been implemented (at least as I understand it), there is still a desire to have the largest possible audience. I’ve been watching with some interest as they’re trying to evolve the model to now enable readers of other metropolitan newspapers around the country to have access to Washington Post content, which is clearly an attempt to broaden the audience as much as possible. I don’t know that there’s got to be one model in journalism.

(Trivia: Marcus Brauchli’s brother David is an exec at the European paywall company Piano Media.)

Lots of other interesting color in there — check it out.

Show tags
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
A bakery, a brewery, and a local news site: There’s a new type of collective growing in Spokane, Washington
“Are we moving fast enough for the length of runway we have to lift off? Or do we need to, you know, keep paving and quickly build more runway? That’s the real question.”
Way back in 1989, USA Today launched an online sports service. I found it at Goodwill
USA Today Sports Center is a time capsule from a period in which a newspaper could convince people to pay five bucks an hour to log onto their service during the big game.
Pageviews, assemble! Why there’s no escaping the Marvel Cinematic Universe online
In 2022, few pop-culture brands move the needle, so newspaper blue-bloods and recipe sites alike rally around Marvel Cinematic Universe content as their last stand.