Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Five years in, Scalawag is reframing who gets included in “the South” (and how to build a business off it)
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
June 4, 2014, 10:58 a.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: www.capitalnewyork.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joseph Lichterman   |   June 4, 2014

The New York Times has about 1,700 prewritten obituaries for when notable figures will die, according to a piece today in Capital New York. Using the lens of Maya Angelou’s death last week, Capital’s Johana Bhuiyan looks at how the Times readies its obituaries in the digital age.

Though it was updated after her death, Angelou’s obituary was initially written in 2011. Within minutes of her death, the obituary was posted online, along with a slideshow and a video. Times obituary editor William McDonald explained how the Times now approaches obits:

Editorially, the demands of the website and its readers — wanting the complete obit ASAP — have made it even more essential that we do as many as we can in advance, so they’re fairly ready to go when the death occurs. That includes not just the text but photos, slide shows, video features and whatever other digital bells and whistles we may want to add. All of which places some additional strains on our relatively small obituary department, but we’ve done well in meeting the challenge, I think.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Five years in, Scalawag is reframing who gets included in “the South” (and how to build a business off it)
“What does it mean for a diverse group of young Southerners to be producing content that is read by mostly white folks — and white folks that are older than them?”
Galaxy brain: The neuroscience of how fake news grabs our attention, produces false memories, and appeals to our emotions
“Highly emotionally provocative information stands a stronger chance of lingering in our minds and being incorporated into long-term memory banks.”
Newsonomics: By selling to America’s worst newspaper owners, Michael Ferro ushers the vultures into Tribune
Astonishingly, history might argue that Sam Zell was only the third-worst owner in recent Tribune history.