Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Can you spot a fake photo online? Your level of experience online matters a lot more than contextual clues
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
July 28, 2015, 5:23 p.m.
Mobile & Apps
LINK: digiday.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   July 28, 2015

After initial reports of insane traffic from Snapchat Discover to the few publishers allowed in, there was a (perhaps to be expected) decline from the stratosphere:

While viewership to Discover channels was significant in the first few days after the portal’s Jan. 27 launch, it has dropped an average of 30 percent to 50 percent since then, according to two people who’ve seen the traffic data. One media firm with a channel on Discover saw its unique views drop from one million to around 700,000 and is trending downward, according to a person close to the media company.

But Digiday’s Lucia Moses reports that a design change has push the traffic back northward:

The messaging app popular among teens launched its Discover feature in January with 11 publishers, but users had to swipe twice to get to their content, making it difficult to, well, discover…It’s in Snapchat’s interest to make the content as viewable as possible now that it’s trying to derive revenue from Discover by running ads in the content, though. So two weeks ago, Snapchat updated the design to make the Discover channels visible in the “Stories” tab, which is just one swipe away from the home screen…

Snapchat is notoriously buttoned-up with the press, and publishers who were part of the Discover launch said they’re under instructions from the app not to share their viewership. But several said they had seen a positive impact. “Our views have doubled,” said one, speaking anonymously.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Can you spot a fake photo online? Your level of experience online matters a lot more than contextual clues
Whether an image looks like a random Facebook post or part of a New York Times story doesn’t make much of a difference. But your level of experience with the Internet and image editing does.
Publishers will soon no longer be able to detect when you’re in Chrome’s incognito mode, weakening paywalls everywhere
A growing number of news sites block incognito readers, figuring they’re probably trying to get around a paywall. But a change from Google will again let people reset their meter with a keystroke.
R.I.P. Quartz Brief, the innovative mobile news app. Maybe “chatting with the news” isn’t something most people really want to do?
Just because people like to chat on their phones doesn’t mean they want to chat with you, news organizations.