Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Ken Doctor: Six months after launching a local news company (in an Alden market), here’s what I’ve learned
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Aug. 10, 2015, 1:37 p.m.
LINK: juliajrh.github.io  ➚   |   Posted by: Joseph Lichterman   |   August 10, 2015

Julia Haslanger wants to know how much you make.

Last Friday, Haslanger, a graduate student in CUNY’s social journalism program, released Journo Salary Sharer, which asks journalists to anonymously share their salary information in order to help start a conversation about how much people in different positions throughout the journalism world earn.

“As journalists, we know how to talk to people. We just have to suck it up and be brave and ask other people how much they make,” Haslanger told me.

“There’s only so much I can do. I’m one person who has one survey on one place on the Internet. But you, as a journalist, have skills to find that information. This is an excuse for journalists to go out and ask those questions and start those conversations.”

The site has two parts. The first part is a survey that asks respondents about their job titles, salaries, how long they’ve been working in the field, the size of the company they work for, the cost of living in their city, and whether they negotiated for their current salary.

There are also optional questions on gender and age.

The other half of the site is a scale asking users how comfortable they are sharing their salary information with others. Based on what users select, Haslanger then offers suggestions for what they can do to advance the conversation around salary. The page also offers pre-written text for users to tweet out a link to the survey.

JournoSalarySharer

Haslanger developed the site because CUNY’s social journalism program requires students to build an online tool that is useful to a community. With assistance from Jue Yang, CUNY’s technologist-in-residence, Haslanger built the site in order to help journalists negotiate fair salaries.

The survey was posted Friday morning, and close to 1,700 people have participated so far. At this point, Haslanger said she has enough information to draw conclusions about how much reporters at large outlets in big cities make, but she’s still hoping to get more information from journalists in different types of jobs and in smaller markets around the United States.

Haslanger has also seen a flood of responses from early-career journalists, but has only received about 250 responses from those with 10 or more years of experience.

Haslanger plans to publish some of her early findings this week, and said she also expects to make the anonymized data public so others can dig into the numbers as well.

“There are a lot of different angles I could go from here, but I just wanted to start with [getting] some numbers out and available to people so they can make decisions, make sure they’re getting paid fairly, and know how to negotiate,” she said.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Ken Doctor: Six months after launching a local news company (in an Alden market), here’s what I’ve learned
We don’t wake up each morning to compete with a print daily, but rather to run our own local news and community model. That’s the key.
The Covid vaccine and the people of Nextdoor
Nextdoor is overlooked as a player in misinformation, and to address “vaccine hesitancy” in America, you might want to start at the neighborhood level, where hesitancy has grown into militancy.
News orgs are getting creative to explain ranked-choice voting to New Yorkers
Questions from readers ranged from basic (What’s ranked choice voting?) to skeptical (Why are we even doing this?) to strategic (How can I optimize my ballot so that [Candidate X] doesn’t win?).