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Drawing on ten years of expertise, the Texas Tribune wants to coach you on its money-making lessons
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Aug. 26, 2015, 10:46 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: docs.google.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   August 26, 2015

CUNY is holding a day-long membership summit — “Membership Strategies for Media: Beyond Pledges and Paywalls” — on Wednesday at its Tow-Knight Center for Digital Journalism in New York. The full program, led by Jeff Jarvis, includes panels with Melody Kramer, who recently wrote about expanding membership models as a Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow; Josh Stearns of the Local News Lab; Amanda Michel of The Guardian; and many others.

If you aren’t attending in person, you can follow along online.

Here’s the event livestream.

An open, collaborative public notebook with detailed write-ups of the panels is here. Melody Kramer also provided notes for her panel, here.

And you can follow #membership on Twitter, though there are many non-journalism related tweets in the mix (maybe they should have chosen a less inclusive hashtag).

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