Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
April 19, 2016, 10:05 a.m.
LINK: www.theskimm.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   April 19, 2016

“Never again will you wonder when Beyoncé tickets go on sale, what time the State of the Union is on, or when your favorite show is back on Netflix”: The extremely popular daily email newsletter The Skimm, which has more than 3.5 million subscribers (that’s an increase of about 2 million since we wrote about the company eight months ago) on Tuesday launched Skimm Ahead, an iPhone app that integrates with the phone’s calendar to keep users posted on national events from entertainment (concerts, Netflix premieres, book releases) to politics to sports.

“If the daily Skimm is about what already happened, this is about what will happen,” Skimm cofounder Carly Zakin told The Wall Street Journal.

The app will cost $2.99 a month after one free month (“That’s less than what you pay at Starbucks a day”). From the Journal:

theSkimm has tapped 12,000 of its most active and social media-oriented readers — they call them Skimmbassadors — and tasked them with promoting the new subscription product, which will not carry any advertising. TheSkimm is not paying these Skimmbassadors for this promotion, but it is offering them some hands-on training in public relations. One Skimmbassador will get a shot at interviewing for a job at the 18-person company.

Users can also read the daily (free) newsletter from within the app and get a push notification about it in the morning.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
“We don’t have to turn around a whole big ship. We can try things.”
The Mississippi Free Press launched early to cover the pandemic, but aims to be in nonprofit news “for the long game”
“If you seem to be an organization that’s only concerned with large donors and large foundations, you’re probably only concerned with one type of reporting.”
Publishers hope fact-checking can become a revenue stream. Right now, it’s mostly Big Tech who is buying.
Facebook alone works with 80 different fact-checking organizations worldwide.