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The Outline, an attempt to build a bolder kind of news site, appears to have met its end
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Jan. 31, 2017, 1:50 p.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: www.harvard.edu  ➚   |   Posted by: Shan Wang   |   January 31, 2017

Media soul-searching continues as editors and reporters from outlets from CNN to The Weekly Standard to The New York Times gather at Harvard University Tuesday afternoon for an event centered on the question of the role of journalism in a “post-truth era.” (The event is cosponsored by the Harvard president’s office, the Nieman Foundation for Journalism, and the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics, and Public Policy.)

Bill Kristol (editor-at-large at The Weekly Standard), Kathleen Kingsbury (managing editor of digital at the Boston Globe), Lolly Bowean (Chicago Tribune reporter and 2017 Nieman Fellow), and Brian Stelter (senior media correspondent at CNN) are all speaking, and Nieman curator Ann Marie Lipinski will lead a conversation with Gerard Baker (editor-in-chief of The Wall Street Journal), Lydia Polgreen (editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post), and David Leonhardt (op-ed columnist at The New York Times and coauthor of the recent 2020 report).

Have questions for the speakers? You can email them now to questions@harvard.edu.

The entire event — happening in Sanders Theatre, from 4 to 6 p.m. — will be livestreamed here. We’ll be will be livetweeting, and you can join in the conversation by following #FutureofNews.

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