Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Apple might be getting into the podcast-making business. Is its reign as the industry’s benevolent overlord coming to an end?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 31, 2017, 1:50 p.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: www.harvard.edu  ➚   |   Posted by: Shan Wang   |   January 31, 2017

Media soul-searching continues as editors and reporters from outlets from CNN to The Weekly Standard to The New York Times gather at Harvard University Tuesday afternoon for an event centered on the question of the role of journalism in a “post-truth era.” (The event is cosponsored by the Harvard president’s office, the Nieman Foundation for Journalism, and the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics, and Public Policy.)

Bill Kristol (editor-at-large at The Weekly Standard), Kathleen Kingsbury (managing editor of digital at the Boston Globe), Lolly Bowean (Chicago Tribune reporter and 2017 Nieman Fellow), and Brian Stelter (senior media correspondent at CNN) are all speaking, and Nieman curator Ann Marie Lipinski will lead a conversation with Gerard Baker (editor-in-chief of The Wall Street Journal), Lydia Polgreen (editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post), and David Leonhardt (op-ed columnist at The New York Times and coauthor of the recent 2020 report).

Have questions for the speakers? You can email them now to questions@harvard.edu.

The entire event — happening in Sanders Theatre, from 4 to 6 p.m. — will be livestreamed here. We’ll be will be livetweeting, and you can join in the conversation by following #FutureofNews.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Apple might be getting into the podcast-making business. Is its reign as the industry’s benevolent overlord coming to an end?
“There remains a lot we don’t know, and I have strong feeling we’re witnessing a little shard of a much larger, complicated soul-searching process.”
West Coast offense: Los Angeles gets a new hub for podcasting to match WNYC Studios out east
Plus: Tim Ferriss brings back ads, two American companies go British, and the mystery of the one-star iTunes review.
What sort of news travels fastest online? Bad news, you won’t be shocked to hear
When one news publisher has a story about something bad — a disaster, a death, or just general terribleness — other publishers move more quickly to match it than they do with good news.