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What makes people avoid the news? Trust, age, political leanings — but also whether their country’s press is free
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March 24, 2017, 11:36 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: www.theverge.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   March 24, 2017

Breaking news alerts, more analytics, summaries of what your followers are tweeting about: Twitter is considering a “new, more enhanced Tweetdeck,” with no ads, The Verge reported Thursday. Some users received a survey about it:

Several of the premium features listed, like advanced publishing features and analytics, are already available through third-party social media management tools like Socialflow and Buffer. Last summer, Twitter released a tool called Twitter Dashboard aimed at tweet scheduling for businesses, but it shut down just a few months later.

Some media folk seemed to like the idea; there was also puzzlement over why Twitter didn’t consider it sooner.

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