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How the Swiss newspaper NZZ is building products to try and cultivate new paying audiences
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May 15, 2012, 1:39 p.m.
Reporting & Production

Richard Sandomir at the Times has word of ESPN’s expansion of the 30 for 30 series of sports documentaries it launched in 2009. That’s great, but most interesting to me was this bit:

As the films roll out, they will be augmented on Grantland by podcasts, feature stories and oral histories. A short digital film — which will be unrelated to the longer ones — will make its debut each month on Grantland.

Mr. Schell described the shorts as “visual editorials,” of five to nine minutes. “They’re meant to be interesting conversations with people who have a point of view about something or sports stories that don’t require a four-act treatment,” he said.

Those “visual editorials” remind me a lot of The New York Times’ Op-Docs, which we wrote about in March.

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