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How can local TV news fix its young person problem? Maybe it needs to look more like Vox
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Oct. 25, 2016, 8:45 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: www.facebook.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   October 25, 2016

Facebook wants journalists to use more Facebook. There’s already Signal, a dashboard to help find and embed content from Facebook and Instagram, and a closed group, News, Media & Publishing on Facebook, which launched in 2013 and has nearly 8,000 members.

On Tuesday, the company announced new online courses for journalists. The free courses, which will focus on discovering content, creating stories, and building audience, will include “best practices and guidelines from Facebook” and will draw on “great journalist case studies.” Three other courses will focus on Facebook Live, Instant Articles, and 360 Photo and Video. There’s also an introductory guide for journalists (which includes “how to apply for the Facebook blue badge that indicates verification”). And Facebook plans to launch webinars aimed at people in different roles like “newsgatherer, content creator, or audience engagement specialist.” The first one, on Thursday, November 3, is about using Facebook Live.

The courses can be found here.

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